The creation of RT was a part of a larger public relations effort by the Russian Government in 2005 that was intended to improve the image of Russia abroad.[31] RT was conceived by former media minister Mikhail Lesin,[32] and Russian president Vladimir Putin's press spokesperson Aleksei Gromov.[33] At the time of RT's founding, RIA Novosti director Svetlana Mironyuk stated: "Unfortunately, at the level of mass consciousness in the West, Russia is associated with three words: communism, snow and poverty," and added "we would like to present a more complete picture of life in our country."[32] It is registered as an autonomous nonprofit organization[2][34] funded by the federal budget of Russia through the Federal Agency on Press and Mass Communications of the Russian Federation.[35]
It’s these little things, plus the channel offerings, that make PlayStation Vue feel more like a traditional TV service (even though it’s not). You also get free DVR service with PlayStation Vue and can store an unlimited number shows for up to a month before they get automatically deleted. We really like the recording features that PlayStation Vue offers, but the downside is that you can only record one show at a time.
General idea: PSA for gamers: PlayStation Vue is a super easy way to seamlessly slide from gaming to that new episode you're trying to watch without switching outputs. (Many other streaming services don't support viewing on Playstation, and if they do, it's only on PS4.) Vue's channel lineup is pretty stellar, with the lowest tier plan offering nearly 50 channels including ESPN, Disney, TBS, and Discovery. Vue allows simultaneous streaming on five devices at once, including a PS4, PS3, plus three other devices — so the whole house can use it even if they've never touched a PlayStation in their life. This also means five virtually unlimited DVRs. 
PS Vue’s biggest selling point is just how many channels you get, boasting the most of any services out there. Plus, you can bolster your services with add-on channels and features. Subscribers to PlayStation Plus (Sony’s premium online service for PS4 and PS3) will get discounts on some of those packages, and some channels are exclusive only to Plus subscribers in the first place. Similarly, PS Vue ties directly into the PS4 interface and the PlayStation ecosystem at large, which makes adopting it almost a no-brainer for PlayStation players looking to add online TV — provided the pricing and channel listings meet your needs.

I just recently "cut the cable"when I moved. Having been immersed in the world of satellite and cable TV for over 20 years, I have to admit I was a bit clueless about how to go about it. I got my Amazon Prime- check, Netflix-check, Hulu-check. Now how the heck do I go about watching my local channels without having to subscribe to a provider? I happened upon a "Cut the Cable" website and there it was- dud! Get an antenna! Go figure.....So, I searched through Amazon and found this amazing little device. Hey- I was expecting rabbit ears (told you I was out of touch). Here's this nifty antenna- a little larger than a mouse pad and and thinner. So! I plugged this little gem into my antenna thingy on my TV- set the find channels. Seriously the set ... full review
Top-rated HDTV indoor antennas include the window-mountable Moho Leaf Metro ($17, above) or the tower-like Terk Omni ($60), both non-amplified antennas that plug directly into a TV tuner. Outdoors, you could try the roof-mountable Antennas Direct ClearStream 2Max or 4Max models, with 60- and 70-mile ranges, respectively. Other antenna makers include 1byOne and View TV.
In July 2016, Ofcom again found RT in breach of its impartiality rules, this time over coverage of the Turkish government's treatment of Kurdish people. Two episodes of Going Underground originally broadcast in March, included claims of attacks, atrocities and genocide against the Kurds, and that "Turkey supports ISIS" without offering adequate counterbalance. RT's representatives stated the network "finds it especially difficult to obtain pro-Turkey views for its programming" because of "political tensions between Russia and Turkey following the downing of a Russian military aircraft by Turkish warplanes in November 2015".[258][259]

General idea: Crunchyroll is Netflix for anime. And it's seriously awesome. With a premium account, you'll get access to over 900 anime shows (for reference, Netflix only has 50 titles). Find old favorites like One Piece, new releases straight from Japan like Megalobox, as well as a wide selection of manga and even a number of live-action J-dramas. If you're an anime newbie, check out Mashable's full rundown on Crunchyroll and our resident anime expert's suggestions on the best shows to watch. 

The thing about internet-delivered TV is that you need a broadband connection that’s copacetic with the streaming lifestyle. This may seem like a foregone conclusion, but we want to make it clear that if you’re going to bet your precious entertainment future on your network, you best have a solid hookup. Netflix and other similar streaming video services suggest a minimum downstream speed of 5Mbps for HD streaming, but that simply is not going to hack it for most folks, especially those with families streaming more than one show or movie at a time.
Netflix – Netflix has loads of content at a low price. Most TV shows wind up on streaming after a season airs. There are also movies and a whole host of children’s programming available. The pricing is reasonable at $8.99 a month for unlimited HD streaming to two TVs simultaneously. If you are comfortable waiting a few months for a TV series, Netflix may be all you need.

fuboTV works on most devices, letting you stream live TV over the internet. It’s really best for sports fans, as the majority of channels included are geared towards sports. Networks like NBCSN, NBA TV, FOX Soccer Plus and others give you all the sports you can handle! And, of course, you can watch FOX News live for up-to-the-minute coverage of the latest and most important news.
Top-rated HDTV indoor antennas include the window-mountable Moho Leaf Metro ($17, above) or the tower-like Terk Omni ($60), both non-amplified antennas that plug directly into a TV tuner. Outdoors, you could try the roof-mountable Antennas Direct ClearStream 2Max or 4Max models, with 60- and 70-mile ranges, respectively. Other antenna makers include 1byOne and View TV.
I bought a 360 degree antenna earlier this year that did not work too well . I live in the county in the middle of eight towers but they are are kinda spread out in three different directions . Three channels would not come in and seven channels were breaking up real bad. with this new 360 degree antenna I am gitting all of those channels and all the others I was already receiving . Now I get thirty channels and they are perfactly clear. For an antenna the size of a dinner plate it does a great job.
This does not mean, however, that you can never watch ESPN again after you cancel cable. Nearly every major media brand is moving toward offering its own standalone subscription service. Until then, though, if it’s important to you to maintain some continuity with your current cable-viewing habits, proceed to the next section for your best options.

By the late 1980s, a software upgrade "option" was offered by United Video for the Amiga 1000-based EPG Sr. This updated version featured a program listings grid identical in appearance to that of the original EPG Sr. version, but confined it to the lower half of the screen. In this new split-screen configuration, which was the forerunner to Prevue Guide, the upper half of the screen displayed static or animated graphical advertisements and logos created locally by each cable system operator. Up to 64 such ads were supported by the software, which ranged from ads for local and national businesses to promotions for cable channels carried by the local system. Locally created text-based advertisements were still supported, however, they now also appeared in the top half of the screen – support for showing them within the listings grid as scrolling ads, or beneath it as crawling banner ads, had been removed.
The light grey program-by-program summaries for individual channels, red and light blue channel highlighting, and graphical "Prevue Weather" forecasts that were previously available to cable systems as optional grid features and inserts remained available in the same manners as before. Closed captioning, MPAA movie rating and VCR Plus+ logos were additionally introduced by this version of the software, and unlike in prior versions, large graphical Prevue Guide logos appeared within its grid, between listings cycles. The old, synthesized interstitial music that had been used since 1988 was also replaced with a more modern piece called "Opening Act," from the defunct James & Aster music library.
Another cable or satellite alternative could include simple online viewing. Many TV stations – especially the larger ones like ABC and CBS – give website visitors access to their show episodes. You can watch episodes that have recently played when you visit their websites. Even some cable TV channels such as The Food Network have full show episodes available for web site visitors.
Lastly, Boxee's selection of streaming apps is huge, but the quantity is more impressive than the quality. Hulu and Amazon are both missing from its list, along with a lot of other heavy hitters that devices like the Roku have available (note that you can get Hulu via an unofficial plugin to one of the other apps, but it isn't perfect). If your main goal is to stream content from internet networks like Revision3, TWiT, TED, and others of that nature, the Boxee will suit you fine. Otherwise, it may seem like it's missing some of the more important stuff. However, it does make good use of what it has with its "universal search" feature, similar to what I love about Google TV: if you search for a TV show, it'll show you the different places you can stream it. The universal search feature doesn't support Netflix like Google TV's does, but it's still pretty handy to have, especially when you have so many streaming channels available to you.
Channel Master's SMARTenna+ is the industry's leading indoor TV antenna. The SMARTenna+ features a sleek, modern design that can fit effortlessly into your home. The antenna houses seven “virtual” antennas inside to provide you with a maximum signal range. It also features both automated and by the button scanning so you will always be in control of your antenna. Did we mention the SMARTenna+ has been called the world's smartest indoor TV antenna? And it is for good reason. The SMARTenna+ features Active Steering Technology which enables virtual antenna steering, giving you the maximum number of channels available and the best reception quality.
This powered antenna does do a better job than my old set of rabbit ears when hooked up to my 42" hdtv, but not that much better. The best part is that because it gets some strength of all my local channels I don't have to add anything after running SETUP ANTENNA on my tv, plus I don't have to aim this antenna, but I do have to aim my old one. The signal is clear, but I can't see any real difference between the powered and unpowered.
With Spectrum TV, for example, you get access to live TV streams for any of the networks in your tier of service. There's also lots of on-demand content for individual shows and some movies. It integrates channel guides and search for select shows/movies. If a channel (or show on a channel) that isn't available to you shows up on a menu, it's generally grayed out. And you can mark shows as favorites so they're easier to follow. But what's annoying is it takes a lot longer for a show to appear in the on-demand section—three or four days, instead of just one with a show on Hulu or even a network's own app, for example.
The $99 Apple TV is a tiny little device that fits anywhere in your living room. The remote is very basic, but extremely easy to use—something a lot of living room remotes lack these days. It feels very solid, and the buttons respond nicely, making the whole product pleasant to use. Setup is a snap: just plug it in, link it up with your iTunes library and Apple ID, and you're ready to go. Typing in your credentials is kind of annoying due to the lack of keyboard. I wish I could set up things like Netflix and Hulu in iTunes from my computer, but for now you'll have to trudge through the remote-driven setup.
Usually, the apps themselves are free. However, some networks offer paid subscription options to access certain shows or old episodes. But that doesn’t mean the cost isn’t potentially reasonable, depending on how many shows you may watch. For example, CBS All Access is available for as little as $5.99 per month (plus tax), which isn’t bad in comparison to the cost of cable.
Most HDTVs made these days have a built in digital tuner. If you bought it a few years ago before the new digital tuners were as common, and it was only advertised as an HDTV monitor, that could be the only caveat. Basically if it has a tuner built in usually it will have a video source on the unit called “TV” or something along those lines. Just plug in an antenna, go to the menu, and have it scan for channels. If you have a tuner those options should be there.
DIRECTV also offers more full-time high-definition (HD) channels than anyone, and it has the ability to record up to 200 hours of HD video content. So whether you’re tuning in to see Tom Brady’s piercing baby-blue eyes or just want to marvel at the realistic zombie makeup on The Walking Dead, you can expect a crystal clear picture for both live TV and recorded shows off your Genie DVR.
One last point on what to watch: If you really want to pay only for what you want to watch and nothing else, don’t forget that iTunes, Amazon, Vudu, Fandango Now, Cinema Now, Google Play and others will gladly sell or rent you movies and episodes of TV series, to watch on your computer or TV. If you’re thinking of your various subscriptions as an analogue to cable, then think of this option as akin to the old-fashioned “pay per view.” The fees can add up if you watch a lot, but these vendors have some free videos, too. 
Netflix is a great place for binge-watching entire seasons all at once. But unless it’s a Netflix original series, you’ll just have to wait until a season finishes airing to get started. But hey, no commercials! Accessing the service shouldn’t be a problem either. You probably have 10 devices in your house right now that came preloaded with the Netflix app. But if you want to use Netflix on more than one device at once, you’ll have to upgrade to the Standard ($10) or Premium ($12) plan.
Hi Kayla! I think I’ve read EVERY word on this particular blog! It has been HIGHLY informative! I’m too wanting to cut cable. These prices . . . man! Who can afford this stuff? I know I can’t anymore. From what I’ve gathered, with a Smart Tv, looks like I can stream Netflix and Hulu. For other channels I and my son like to watch I’ll need Sling. And for local channels an antenna. My question is for internet or streaming, do I HAVE to have an ISP? Can I purchase a modem and/or router? I know internet only plans are much cheaper but if I can get outta paying for that as well I sure would like to!! MUCH thanks to you!! I am now your FAN ?
Next, connect the HDHomeRun box to your home modem or router using the included ethernet cable. Just plug one end of the ethernet cable into the box and the other end into the ethernet port on the modem or router. The HDHomeRun will always need to stay connected to the modem or router, so make sure you've got room nearby to set up the box and antenna. You could also invest in a longer ethernet cable if you need to.
TiVo – The granddaddy of DVRs, a TiVo device is great for streaming programs from Netflix, Blockbuster, and Amazon Video On Demand. It connects to your home's TV antenna so you can watch free network programming, and the HD TiVo units will even pick up your local high-definition channels. The drawback is that on top of the price of the device ($200 and up), you'll need a monthly $12 subscription to access TiVo's best features.

This is by no means a comprehensive list of alternatives to cable, but it’s a great mix-and-match way to get started. And you can usually get a free trial of almost any of these before you commit. If you’re not quite ready to give up your favorite sports or movie channels, you can always call your cable or satellite provider and try to negotiate a better deal. Knowing your options will usually work to your advantage!
There are relatively few standalone apps that offer local content, but there is one that is worth noting here. NewsON is a platform for local news stations. If you're lucky, you'll find that your local station is available live on the platform. NewsON's app is available on streaming devices like Roku and Amazon Fire TV. Read our complete review of NewsON here. It's worth noting that the service has improved a bit since our review was written.
Cable and satellite companies curate content to offer a variety of channels, and they deliver this content to customers through a variety of technologies. Cable television services are delivered using cable strung along power lines or buried underground, while satellite TV service is beamed to a satellite dish located on the property, which then sends content to the television set.
We included our custom-built XBMC media center—not everyone's taste, but a geekier option we love—for a bit of extra comparison (Note: since the writing of this article, streaming services like Netflix, Hulu, and Amazon have gotten much more difficult in XBMC. See this post for more information). Obviously, you can't boil down five devices into just a small chart, though. So, we played with each of these five devices over the course of a few weeks, and here are our thoughts on each one: what it does well, what it lacks, and who it's good for.
In my case having cable TV is the bargain over high speed internet. I called and asked for what they call “limited service” cable — it gives me the major networks, with QVC, FAM, all the spanish channels and two public broadcasting stations thrown in, for $17.00 a month. The high speed internet was costing me $52 a month, so I reluctantly let it go. Watching TV online is no bargain at all for me.
From April to August 2011, RT ran a half-hour primetime show Adam vs. the Man,[144][145][146] hosted by former Iraq War Marine veteran and high-profile anti-war activist Adam Kokesh. David Weigel writes that Kokesh defended RT's "propaganda" function, saying "We're putting out the truth that no one else wants to say. I mean, if you want to put it in the worst possible abstract, it's the Russian government, which is a competing protection racket against the other governments of the world, going against the United States and calling them on their bullshit."[45] The conservative media watchdog Accuracy in Media criticized Kokesh's appearance on RT, writing RT uses Americans like Kokesh to make propaganda points.[147]
What I love about using Playon is that it integrates very nicely with my xbox 360. I can use my regular remote to watch tv shows, movies/etc through playon, just like i would with a regular dvd player or network media player. i don’t have to have a keyboard and mouse sitting on our coffee table at all times, i can just navigate to the playon folder on the xbox, and start watching shows on the big screen. I also have an old media computer hooked up to our big tv, but i rarely turn it on anymore because of the nice setup with playon.
For those fed up with their cable or satellite TV company, there has never been a better time to cut the cord. Streaming video services are giving traditional cable and satellite TV stiff competition by delivering live sports and prime-time TV programming online, often for a drop in price, while premium channels like HBO and Showtime are available as separate streaming services or add-on bundles.
Once you have a TV that is “digital ready”, all you need to do is install a TV antenna. I installed the Mohu Sky 60 outdoor antenna on my roof and now I receive all the major local broadcast networks. Mohu also makes quality indoor antennas like The Mohu Curve and Mohu Leaf. If you are interested in purchasing a Mohu antenna, check my Mohu promo page for a big discount.
Because Vue allows you to watch on up to 5 devices at the same time, the whole family can watch exactly what they want to. This is why we recommend Vue to families and large households with roommates. You can stream FOX News and the rest of the channels you love on streaming players like your PS3 or PS4 consoles, Amazon Fire TV, Roku (Vue is a great way to watch live TV on Roku), Apple TV, or Chromecast. They also offer iOS and Android apps, but there are some limitations with those. Your PlayStation Vue account is tied to your home network, so streaming while on the go is restricted. Even with the mobile apps, what you can watch away from home will be limited.
I just recently "cut the cable"when I moved. Having been immersed in the world of satellite and cable TV for over 20 years, I have to admit I was a bit clueless about how to go about it. I got my Amazon Prime- check, Netflix-check, Hulu-check. Now how the heck do I go about watching my local channels without having to subscribe to a provider? I happened upon a "Cut the Cable" website and there it was- dud! Get an antenna! Go figure.....So, I searched through Amazon and found this amazing little device. Hey- I was expecting rabbit ears (told you I was out of touch). Here's this nifty antenna- a little larger than a mouse pad and and thinner. So! I plugged this little gem into my antenna thingy on my TV- set the find channels. Seriously the set ... full review
In 1988, United Video Holdings' Trakker, Inc. unit was renamed Prevue Networks, Inc. The split-screen version of the EPG Sr. software was further updated and renamed "Prevue Guide". Now running on the Amiga 2000, it displayed a split-screen listings grid visually identical to the upgraded EPG Sr.'s, but also supported – along with up to 128 locally inserted top-screen graphical advertisements – the display of video with accompanying sound in the top half of the screen,[6] primarily promos for upcoming television shows, films and special events. These videos appeared in either the left or right halves of the top portion of the screen, coupled with supplementary information concerning the advertised program in the opposing halves (program title, channel, air date and time).
If you're looking to stream from more than a few services, this is the box to get. It's got nearly everything, and you can keep your menu as minimal or as packed as you want. The other services like games are nice, too. If you want to play local files too, you can do so with Plex, but don't expect an insanely full-featured media center out of it. All in all, if streaming is your top priority, get a Roku.
The interface is very pretty and shockingly easy to use. Plug in your USB drive and go to "Files" to start playing them. Have some files stored on the network? Just go to Movies or TV shows and add it as a source. Head to Services for streaming channels like Netflix, Hulu Plus, Vudu movies, MLB, and a few others. The remote is a traditional remote that feels a little cheap, but works as well as you'd expect. The interface is also somewhat configurable, letting you view your movies and shows in a few different list formats.
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