General idea: Need we say more than nearly 50 channels for $20 a month? That's unheard of, guys. We have yet to find a streaming service that offers that much for that little, and it's really all we need to say about Philo. The channels aren't news or sports oriented, but if you don't care about that, the variety is pretty legit: Featuring BBCAmerica, Cheddar, The Food Network, GSN, TLC, and more. There's a seven day free trial that you can try, and the coolest part is that they don't require your credit card information to set it up. Just enter your mobile number and you're ready to watch. They'll text you and ask for a payment later when your week runs out, but at least you know you won't be charged if you accidentally forget to cancel.
Hi Peter, I think I need your help…I am so glad I came across your article and as I believe it will save me a lot of money too. I just got express internet service at my new home and would like to be able to see at least basic TV stations (Fox, cbs so on) and I heard of this ‘free over the air’. I am not very good with regards to technical matters and I would like it to be as simple as possible for me to execute :). I have an old TV (won’t get a newer one any time soon) and would like to use the ‘free on air’ option everyone is talking about over the past few comments. So do i just walk into a electric store and get a digital to analog box with an antenna, connect it to my tv and i can just like that receive the channels? Or is there more? Thank you in advance!
Pros: The most consumer-friendly terms (up to six screens, no DVR storage limits), best program guide navigation, easiest one-click for adding shows to DVR record list. Terrific app that makes it easy to watch the TV shows from bedroom, living room, office, park – anywhere. Plus, if YouTube TV doesn't have your show, the main YouTube website probably does have some variation of it. There's enough to keep you busy for days. The No. 1 choice for cord cutters – unless you live in an Amazon world. In which case,, buy a Roku streaming stick and get YouTube that way. It's that good. 

The crown jewel driving this premium streaming service is Star Trek: Discovery (which isn't even that good a Star Trek show), plus other originals like The Good Fight, which can only be seen via All Access, at least in the US (ST:D is on Netflix in other countries). You can also add Showtime programming to watch in the All Access interface for $14.99 per month.
What you get: With recently updated pricing, Sling’s Orange package is now $25 and includes about 30 cable channels but no broadcast TV. It supports one user at a time. Sling Blue, also $25 per month, supports three users and a different mix of about 40 channels, including local broadcasts and regional sports. (Among other differences, Sling Orange includes ESPN.) A combined plan costs $40. Themed add-on packs cost $5 per month, and you can add HBO, $15; Showtime, $10; and Starz, $9.
I would love to save, although our cable bill for TV is not extraordinary. But I’m 75 and I don’t understand the details. We don’t want to watch TV on a computer. It sounds as if the cheaper options all require the internet. But the internet doesn’t connect to the TV set. I don’t think our TV can receive a wireless signal unless we add some kind of cable box to it (it has a separate cable going to it than the cable box for the computers). Also, my husband watches FOX news most of the day and also all the channels with food shows, Alaskan living, ancient aliens, Pitbulls and Paroles – so we don’t want to cut off his entertainment. We live in SE Iowa and our cable bill is $157 a month including: high speed internet, landline with free long distance, TV package, TIVO. The basic cost is $120 – the rest is fees and taxes, etc. The stuff tacked onto the bill is ridiculous! Also, we practically never watch a movie – never as far as newer movies go. And we aren’t interested in the shows produced by HBO or Netflix, etc. I’m thinking our current plan is our best option. Am I missing something?
We just bought – and returned – what you refer to as a “networked media device,” an LG “wi-fi ready” blu-ray player. Turns out it wasn’t what I’d call “wifi ready” since you had to buy a proprietary wireless adapter from LG to get it connected to a wireless LAN. (To be fair, if you don’t mind 100′ of CAT6 cable running through your house or drilling a lot of holes and fishing cable, you could hook this thing up that way. But, that’s not what we had in mind.) Anyway, it was on sale for $300.
By the late 1980s, a software upgrade "option" was offered by United Video for the Amiga 1000-based EPG Sr. This updated version featured a program listings grid identical in appearance to that of the original EPG Sr. version, but confined it to the lower half of the screen. In this new split-screen configuration, which was the forerunner to Prevue Guide, the upper half of the screen displayed static or animated graphical advertisements and logos created locally by each cable system operator. Up to 64 such ads were supported by the software, which ranged from ads for local and national businesses to promotions for cable channels carried by the local system. Locally created text-based advertisements were still supported, however, they now also appeared in the top half of the screen – support for showing them within the listings grid as scrolling ads, or beneath it as crawling banner ads, had been removed.
The other caveat is that the majority of these channels aren’t actually TV channels but internet channels, meaning stuff from websites and online creators like IGN, CNET, and Cheddar, rather than traditional TV channels. You’ll still get those, too, but you won’t find any of the major prime-time networks or cable favorites like Comedy Central, Syfy, or FX here.
For supporters of teams outside your local area, some sport-specific streaming options might also be attractive. Each major sports league offers some sort of online viewing option for somewhere in the neighborhood of $110 a year, with the caveat that local games are blacked out. (NFL fans can pay only $69.99 to watch any team they like, but must make do with replays.)
Philo ($16/mo. - $20/mo.): This new cut-rate service is cheap for a reason: It eliminates all sports, major networks and premium movie channels, delivering instead what amounts to a stripped-down basic cable package with the likes of History Channel, A&E and TV Land. Philo also has limited DVR storage and can be watched on multiple devices simultaneously. It’s a good starter option for people who want a solid array of traditional cable channels to supplement with subscriptions to Netflix, HBO Now and others. 

I just wanted to say that this is an awesome site with very valuable information. I dumped our cable three months ago and faced almost getting thrown out of the house (not really) because my family was so attached to cable. Our finances were on the decline and we needed to save and cut back so I investigated the possibility of getting rid of cable, and I’m so glad we did. There are sooooo many different ligit sites to use to watch television shows, movies, documentaries, almost anything you like without paying a dime. The only problem I’m facing is providing enough sports for my husband who is a huge sports fan. He is currently watching ESPN 3 but that’s a little limiting from what he says. The crazy thing is that he’s dealing with it because he knows how much money we’re saving each month. Our cable bill was $174.00 a month, can you believe we were foolish enough to pay that much and had paid it for over 5 years. I’m ashamed to do the math to see how much money we threw away. Could have paid for a couple of family vacations.
Personally, I have a 50 Mbps connection through a Verizon Fios internet only plan. They have competitive pricing for internet service. Furthermore, the quality of service is excellent, and the customer support is much better than other major competitors. See if they are available in your area by checking this promo page. I was able to get their service at a great price using that link.
Hi Kayla, have you heard anything about EZ Digital? Want to cancel my cable and just saw this website offering EZ Digital. I guess it’s an indoor antenna you can buy for $30 to $50. and you can get 50+ channels. Looks good. You buy it so no monthly fee. Just a little skeptical because the don’t offer a link to get more info and there’s no phone number to contact. If it’s legitimate, would be great. Your thoughts? Thanks for all the great too!
The chart -- which is too big to fit on this page, so I made it a Google spreadsheet -- answers the question of which streaming local channels are available where. You see, just because a service like DirecTV Now offers Fox, that doesn't mean it offers your local Fox station live. If you live in Asheville, Las Vegas or Schenectady, for example, DirecTV Now doesn't carry your local Fox station. Hulu and YouTube TV do, however.

Cable companies, of course, are freaking out: eMarketer says 22.2 million US adults cut the cord by the end of 2017, a trend that will continue for all age demographics below 55. In a November 2017 survey, Leichtman Research said that in the third quarter that year, the top six cable companies lost 290,000 subscribers, compared to 90,000 in Q3 of 2016. It's worse for the satellite providers Dish and DirecTV, which lost 475,000, while internet TV services (specifically via Sling TV and DirecTV Now) gained 536,000.

In broad strokes, the build and material quality is much more important in long HDMI cables than short. Over 15ft/3m there is a much higher chance that a mediocre cable won't work, or won't work at the resolution you want. This still doesn't mean you need to spend a fortune on a long cable, there are plenty of options for roughly the same price per-foot as the ones mentioned above. It does mean that no-name cables might be less likely to work. 
In 2012, Jesse Zwick of The New Republic criticized RT, stating it held that "civilian casualties in Syria are minimal, foreign intervention would be disastrous, and any humanitarian appeals from Western nations are a thin veil for a NATO-backed move to isolate Iran, China, and Russia." He wrote that RT wants to "make the United States look out of line for lecturing Russia."[142] Zwick also wrote that RT provided a "disproportionate amount of time" to covering libertarian Republican Ron Paul during his 2012 presidential campaign. Writing after her 2014 on-air resignation, Liz Wahl suggested the reason for this "wasn't his message of freedom and liberty but his non-interventionist stance and consistent criticism of U.S. foreign policy. His message fit RT's narrative that the United States is a huge bully."[233] In a June 2011 broadcast of Adam vs. the Man, host Adam Kokesh had endorsed fundraising for Paul, leading to a complaint to the Federal Election Commission charging a political contribution had been made by a foreign corporation. Kokesh denied his cancellation in August was related to the complaint, but said it did involve Paul's aide Jesse Benton.[146]

The channel was launched as Russia Today on 10 December 2005. At its launch, the channel employed 300 journalists, including approximately 70 from outside Russia.[31] Russia Today appointed Margarita Simonyan as its editor-in-chief, who recruited foreign journalists as presenters and consultants.[32] Simonyan stated that the channel's intent was to have a "professional format" akin to the BBC and Euronews that would "reflect Russia's opinion of the world" and present a "more balanced picture" of Russia.[37]
Cable-replacement streaming services work exactly the same as having cable — live channels presented in real time — except they come streaming over the Internet rather than via an analog wire. The upside is that you don't have to give up the channels that you love. Sling TV carries multiple ESPN stations, plus Cartoon Network, TBS, Bloomberg, CNN, History and dozens of others. PlayStation Vue offers SyFy, Spike, USA, VH1, Fox News, Nickelodeon and more. You can also record programs to watch later on PS Vue, just like you would with a cable DVR box.
YouTube is another option for online viewing that can take the place of your cable or satellite package. The popular web channel shares many movies and TV show episodes for legal viewing. YouTube won’t offer an abundant selection of quality movies and TV show episodes. Still, there are some available, and it’s free with your Internet access package.

In December 2016, Ofcom found RT in breach of its impartiality rules for the 10th time since the English-language channel launched. A Crosstalk episode broadcast the previous July, contained a debate about the NATO 2016 Warsaw summit in which all members of the panel expressed critical views. RT's representatives again stated that they couldn't find anybody with alternative opinions willing to take part, and that captions with pro-NATO comments should have been added before broadcast, but the wrong text was accidentally used.[264][265]


I would love to save, although our cable bill for TV is not extraordinary. But I’m 75 and I don’t understand the details. We don’t want to watch TV on a computer. It sounds as if the cheaper options all require the internet. But the internet doesn’t connect to the TV set. I don’t think our TV can receive a wireless signal unless we add some kind of cable box to it (it has a separate cable going to it than the cable box for the computers). Also, my husband watches FOX news most of the day and also all the channels with food shows, Alaskan living, ancient aliens, Pitbulls and Paroles – so we don’t want to cut off his entertainment. We live in SE Iowa and our cable bill is $157 a month including: high speed internet, landline with free long distance, TV package, TIVO. The basic cost is $120 – the rest is fees and taxes, etc. The stuff tacked onto the bill is ridiculous! Also, we practically never watch a movie – never as far as newer movies go. And we aren’t interested in the shows produced by HBO or Netflix, etc. I’m thinking our current plan is our best option. Am I missing something?
However, there is no Android app. For Android users, the company suggests using your included Chrome browser, which is not optimal. From testing, using Philo on an Android device through the web browser is extremely battery draining and might cause your device to heat up significantly with the added processing power needed to stream videos through the browser.
 “We cut out cable and tried to replace it with just streaming options, then with those plus PlayStation Vue (because they were the only option for live sports). That was a bust because the internet streaming couldn’t keep up with the speed of most sports, plus the DVR options were abysmal [which made missing live game broadcasts not an option]. So we went back! We are the proud payers of a DIRECTV bill and I’m not even sad about it.” ― Stephanie Bowen Earley 
I have a Samsung S8 plus. Adaptor failed to work initially. I had to set the USB mode to PTP and it worked perfectly. To set the USB mode go to ---> Settings/Developer Options/USB Configuration. If Developer Options isn't in your settings, then go to the About Phone menu in Settings, then find the "Build number" entry and tap on it seven times. Once you've done that, you'll see a message that says "Developer mode has been turned on."
Amazon Fire ($39.99 - $74.99): Amazon’s set-top box and its cheaper stick have the advantage of syncing well with any other Amazon devices you may have. You can ask your Alexa to find a show for you, and after you start watching it, you can pause it on your TV and pick it up later on your Fire tablet. As with the Roku, the Amazon Fire’s features have also been integrated into a smart TV. The most expensive version of the box adds an HD antenna for picking up free over-the-air local broadcast signals. One common complaint about Fire devices is that they push Amazon Prime Video content over that of other streaming video companies, but that’s a bit of a nitpick. Netflix and Hulu shows are still easy to access with this interface.
Cable is too expensive, but it's not useless – it's just overpriced. Most of us are at least a little reluctant to part with cable, because we like TV. Sure, you can cut the cord and replace it with nothing, but since you're reading an article called How to Watch TV Without Cable, we're going to assume that – like us and our readers here at Cordcutting.com, you like TV. You just don't like cable.
In hindsight, some TV executives believe the industry would be much healthier now if everyone—programmers and distributors—had agreed to make all episodes of shows available to cable subscribers on any device. That was the dream behind TV Everywhere, an idea hatched in 2009 by Comcast CEO Brian Roberts and Time Warner CEO Jeff Bewkes. But in those crucial early days, TV Everywhere struggled to get off the ground.

Philo is unique among the other skinny bundle internet TV services in that it does not offer any sports channels. That means if you love both MTV and ESPN, Philo is not the service for you. By eschewing sports channels, Philo is able to offer entertainment-only networks for a low cost, but this does ultimately create a more niche service, compared to other options like Sling TV and DirecTV Now. You won’t get any sports coverage at all with Philo.


What you get: The sports-centric Fubo now offers about 75 channels for the base $45-per-month package, or more than 90 channels with the new $50-per-month Fubo Extra plan. With Fubo you get a mix of live and on-demand channels from broadcast networks (CBS, Fox, and NBC in most markets), cable channels (A&E, Bravo, FX, SyFy, USA), and sports networks (BeIn Sports, FS1, Golf Channel, NBA TV). You also now get Turner channels, plus sports programming such as the MLB on TBS and the NBA on TNT. Also in the mix: a robust roster of regional sports networks—including those from NBC, Fox, and Yes—for local-team action, including MLB and NHL games. The service comes with a free cloud DVR that lets you store 30 hours of shows, movies, and games.
On either device, using just Netflix and Hulu Plus (each require $8 per month subscriptions) gives you a good variety of popular programming. Between the two you can binge on previous seasons of everything from Breaking Bad to Downton Abbey, watch current episodes of The Daily Show and Parks and Recreation and make a dent in your bucket list of must-see film classics.
The Roku's selection of channels is as good as it gets: Netflix, Hulu, Amazon, Vudu, Crackle, HBO Go, MLB.tv, NHL, NBA, Epix, and a lot more. It would be nice to see some better support from people like NBC, ABC, CNN, and other news channels, though—right now, the channels are either audio podcasts only or clips of popular shows, but rarely full episodes. The Roku also recently got the Plex app, which allows it to play items from a Plex media server—perfect for those few movies you've ripped or downloaded. It also contains a few of Plex's streaming channels, but not all of them are available at the time of this writing. Still, Plex is a very nice touch to a device that previously couldn't play those files at all.
Depending on the range of viewing habits, some people will have to utilize more of the below options than others. If you decide to cancel your cable subscription, you’re more likely going to have to subscribe to several different services to access all of the shows that you want. For some, this might not actually save money, which is usually the purpose of cutting the cord. Before making any decisive actions, first see if you can utilize our tips for saving money on your existing subscription.

The channel was launched as Russia Today on 10 December 2005. At its launch, the channel employed 300 journalists, including approximately 70 from outside Russia.[31] Russia Today appointed Margarita Simonyan as its editor-in-chief, who recruited foreign journalists as presenters and consultants.[32] Simonyan stated that the channel's intent was to have a "professional format" akin to the BBC and Euronews that would "reflect Russia's opinion of the world" and present a "more balanced picture" of Russia.[37]
The savings are all tied to a service that is in a sense revolutionary. Sling TV, a new live TV streaming service from Dish provides you with access to networks like ESPN 1, ESPN 2, HGTV, Food TV,TBS, Disney and more for $19.99 per month. All you need is an internet connection to watch Sling TV on a television, phone or tablet. With a deal I found, just for signing up, you get a FREE Fire TV Stick.
I just recently "cut the cable"when I moved. Having been immersed in the world of satellite and cable TV for over 20 years, I have to admit I was a bit clueless about how to go about it. I got my Amazon Prime- check, Netflix-check, Hulu-check. Now how the heck do I go about watching my local channels without having to subscribe to a provider? I happened upon a "Cut the Cable" website and there it was- dud! Get an antenna! Go figure.....So, I searched through Amazon and found this amazing little device. Hey- I was expecting rabbit ears (told you I was out of touch). Here's this nifty antenna- a little larger than a mouse pad and and thinner. So! I plugged this little gem into my antenna thingy on my TV- set the find channels. Seriously the set ... full review
i use justin.tv as well as steam2watch.com for all my sporting events.felt the same way as others about dropping cable PRIOR to finding these sites. no brainer after that. also have free wi fi internet through open unsecured routers in the neighborhood. secure it on my end with an old linksys router(wrt54g) and free software from dd-wrt.com.you can pick these up cheap on ebay or craigslist( mine cost me a whole 15 bucks!).
I had planed to purchase another set of Terk leapfrog transmitter and receiver , but thanks to an Amazon review on the product I realized that the 2.4 ghz systems where becoming obsolete due to the saturation of WIFI signals .So I deduced that it wasn't that my Terk system failed it was that my neighbor got new internet service . The Nyrius set up works perfectly at 5.8 ghz and I can even run my microwave w/o interference . and it pays for its self because the cable/satellite crooks charge upwards of $7 a month to "rent" additional units . My primary TV in the family room I use this on my kitchen TV ,the remote works a room away no issues . I have additional receivers coming for use on my patio this summer and for the work shop in my garage .Now if only the ... full review
As these services begin to invest more of their money to create original programming and securing streaming rights to shows became more expensive, their back catalogs of old shows have started to suffer. For example, even as Netflix made new episodes of Arrested Development and a second season of Fuller House (no one asked them to do that, by the way), shows like Scrubs or the first six seasons of Futurama are no longer available. Because of this, it’s increasingly becoming a good idea to treat these services a bit more like individual networks than comprehensive libraries of all the TV and movies you’ll ever want to watch.

I just watch tv with an antenna. I get every network channel except cbs,. There are some extras like METV, QVC, HSN, Buzzer, Laff,, Hero, etc. About 40 channels in all. Not bad for a $30 antenna. I get the season of Big Bang Theory on DVD at Christmas. And cruise the used DVD store for Game of Thrones, Orange is the New Black and whatever else I might want to watch. I used to watch Grey’s Anatomy on ABC online on my laptop if I missed it airing (no Tivo or anything) until I started to hate the show. I’d totally get one of those plans like Sling or Netflix , but I have satellite internet and only have so much data per month.
Perhaps no one deserves more credit for threatening the old TV business model than Netflix Chief Executive Officer Reed Hastings. As the driving force behind the world’s largest streaming video service, with about 130 million subscribers, he’s taught consumers to expect an abundance of old and new shows and movies, without the irritation of commercial interruptions, for just $8 a month.
A few of the previous services have been notable for their sports content (YouTube TV and Hulu with Live TV, in particular), but if sports is one of your primary concerns, you’ll want to look into FuboTV. This is another relatively new service that has been gaining some recognition for the niche it appeals to, especially after it was advertised as a way to easily watch Super Bowl 52 with its free trial. It is quickly on the rise, too: The service announced that as of September 2018 it was approaching 250,000 subscribers, up from 100,000 in September 2017. That may not be the millions of subscribers boasted by Sling TV and DirecTV Now, but it is substantial growth.
If you’re looking to watch FOX News without cable and you’ve heard of Sling TV (one of the most popular cable alternatives), you may be wondering if you can get FOX News on Sling TV. Unfortunately, Sling does not currently carry the channel, although they may in the future. The services listed above are good alternatives that does let you stream FOX News, though!
On FOXNews.com, you can watch some clips of news coverage and read about the day’s events. However, it’s not a true FOX News live stream like the one you’d see on cable or one of the services described above. This can help you keep up with breaking news, but not much more. The content changes often and you won’t get a complete FOX news live stream for free.

Showtime has made itself an add-on with just about any service that offers the option. It's available through Hulu, Amazon Prime, and CBS All Access, plus the live TV streaming services (below). Or use the apps on Apple TV, iOS, Android, Roku, and Xbox One. The price to get Showtime those services is generally a couple buck lower per month, a $24 a year savings.


Netflix: Offer available 1/31 – 4/3/2019 and must be redeemed by 8/31/2019. Valid for 12 months of Netflix service on the Netflix Premium UHD streaming plan for $15.99/month (total value of $191.88) with subscription to eligible Verizon Fios plan. Must maintain qualifying Fios services for 31 days after installation, with no past-due balance to receive a one-time bill credit of $191.88 applicable directly to customer’s Netflix account. A Netflix compatible device (manufactured and sold separately) and broadband internet connection are required. 4K Ultra HD availability subject to device capabilities and content availability. Not redeemable or refundable for cash. Value may be applied to a different Netflix streaming plan; exchanges in this manner may alter the duration of the offer. Netflix Service price plans subject to change. Not available to subscribers billed through iTunes or Google play unless subscriber begins a new subscription billed via alternate payment provider or via Netflix.com. See www.netflix.com/termsofuse
If you want to take advantage of streaming services — Netflix, Hulu, Amazon Prime and so forth — you'll need a way to display them on your TV. If you have a recent TV from a major manufacturer, you may not need to get anything at all. Smart TVs usually have these apps built in, and almost every high-end TV sold within the last two years or so has smart capabilities.
YouTube TV has AMC, but the live streaming service is only available in a small number of cities across the U.S. That’s likely to change later in 2017. For $35 per month, YouTube TV offers 40+ channels, including USA Network, FX and IFC. Right now, you need to use a Chromecast or Airplay via Apple TV to live stream on YouTube TV. But that’s like to change by this fall — maybe even in time for Season 8 – so stay tuned.
Philo ($16/mo. - $20/mo.): This new cut-rate service is cheap for a reason: It eliminates all sports, major networks and premium movie channels, delivering instead what amounts to a stripped-down basic cable package with the likes of History Channel, A&E and TV Land. Philo also has limited DVR storage and can be watched on multiple devices simultaneously. It’s a good starter option for people who want a solid array of traditional cable channels to supplement with subscriptions to Netflix, HBO Now and others. 
Amazon’s Prime video service offers a modest selection of licensed TV shows and movies, alongside its own critically acclaimed original series like Jack Ryan and The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel. The service has been working hard to close the gap with Netflix and beyond, including the addition of bundles like Showtime and Starz networks at reduced prices with a Prime account, along with a good selection of streaming content available in both 4K and HDR. The company also offers video on demand, of course, allowing you to rent or buy newer movies and TV shows. Finally, Amazon has introduced a monthly plan for $13 per month. If you tend to do some regular shopping at Amazon, however, Prime’s free 2-day shipping makes the $99/year subscription a much better deal.
We think it’s worth the upgrade to the Hopper though, because along with all the other awesome Hopper features, DISH has integrated Amazon Alexa voice commands into its DVR experience. No longer must you sift through the couch-cushion chasms to find your lost remote. You can simply tell Alexa to turn on This Is Us and cry your eyes out with the rest of us.
PlayOn – If you've got an Xbox 360 or Playstation 3, this software download lets you wirelessly stream internet video content from Hulu, Netflix, and more right to your game box. It'll also pick up content from ESPN.com and CBS.com, or grab a free plugin to stream programming from The Weather Channel, Adult Swim, The Food Network, and more. PlayOn has a 14-day free trial, then you'll have to pop for $40 to keep it.
And, as I so often say over on Cordcutting.com, saying goodbye to cable doesn’t have to mean saying goodbye to live TV. Everything cable has to offer can be matched by cord cutting alternatives – and that’s true even of the local stations that offer you local news, sporting events, and more. Here’s how to watch local channels on your TCL Roku TV, no cable required.
* It is possible to build an antenna for less than $20 that can receive stations from over 50 miles away. Google for “M4 DB4 antenna DIY” for plans and instructions. A home-built antenna can be specificly tuned to the RF channels in your area. My area still has 5 very important stations in the Hi-VHF range – I suspect most metro areas are in a similar situation, though many stations are broadcasting on UHF now.

“Paid for an extra Hulu package to watch sports games and some live TV, but it only works on my iPad, not my smart TV or Apple TV. I was watching the Super Bowl on the networks app, and it cut off in the fourth quarter due to ‘streaming rights’... on the networks app?? How? What am I paying for? Pretty crappy time to cut me off! I had to scramble with guests at my house to find it on YouTube. I am frustrated with paying extra but then the options are still so limited.” ― Ashley Ryan Larrabee 


Believe it or not, you can still have all this for significantly less than the price of cable. Even after subscribing to HBO Now, Netflix, Hulu, CBS All Access, and Amazon Prime Video, you’ll still be more than $250 in the black. Don’t care for Girls or Game of Thrones? You can replace the HBO option with Sling TV for $60 more per year ($5 more per month); about the same price as buying two individual TV seasons.

This type of service is also used to circumvent sports network blackouts or simply to mask your identity online from would-be identity thieves. Of course, check with your content provider’s terms of service to make sure you are not breaking any end-user agreements. To learn the differences between a Smart DNS and VPN check out my post on VPN vs Smart DNS.
Once you have a TV that is “digital ready”, all you need to do is install a TV antenna. I installed the Mohu Sky 60 outdoor antenna on my roof and now I receive all the major local broadcast networks. Mohu also makes quality indoor antennas like The Mohu Curve and Mohu Leaf. If you are interested in purchasing a Mohu antenna, check my Mohu promo page for a big discount.
Hi Kayla, have you heard anything about EZ Digital? Want to cancel my cable and just saw this website offering EZ Digital. I guess it’s an indoor antenna you can buy for $30 to $50. and you can get 50+ channels. Looks good. You buy it so no monthly fee. Just a little skeptical because the don’t offer a link to get more info and there’s no phone number to contact. If it’s legitimate, would be great. Your thoughts? Thanks for all the great too!

This powered antenna does do a better job than my old set of rabbit ears when hooked up to my 42" hdtv, but not that much better. The best part is that because it gets some strength of all my local channels I don't have to add anything after running SETUP ANTENNA on my tv, plus I don't have to aim this antenna, but I do have to aim my old one. The signal is clear, but I can't see any real difference between the powered and unpowered.

I am 81 years old. Am tired of paying $66.98 per month for cable.. also pay $51.99 per mo. for internet… and the e-mail has been down for 3 days now. I am in the Atlanta metro area. there is no way I could understand or know how to do what you have. Is there any business in this area that you know of that could set me up. A one time fee would be worth it … my main recreation is the TV and computer. Hopefully Charter will have e-mail fixed so I can receive and send soon. I appreciate any help you can point me to. Thank you.
FuboTV offers two plans. The first, “Fubo, includes more than 70 channels for $45 per month, and the second, “Fubo Extra,” bumps the package up to 80-plus channels for $50, though your first month on either plan will be discounted by $5. Both plans include a healthy mix of both sports and nonsports channels, such as NBC Sports Network, NFL Network, NBA TV, and the Pac-12 Network on the sports side, along with staples like HGTV, FX, and widespread local network channel support on the other. In August 2018, FuboTV signed a multiyear deal bringing the Turner networks — including TNT, TBS, CNN, Cartoon Network, Adult Swim, TruTV, TCM, and HLN — to the service. Not only did the service add these channels, but it did so without upping the price.

In January 2013, it was announced that TV Guide Network would be renamed TVGN.[30] The name change and new logo, which de-emphasizes the channel's ties to TV Guide magazine took effect on April 15, 2013. The immediate effect of the purchase by CBS saw the summer series Big Brother After Dark move from Showtime 2 to TVGN, along with same-day repeats of The Young and the Restless moving to the network from Soapnet, which ceased operations in December 2013. Fellow CBS soap The Bold and the Beautiful soon also joined the TVGN lineup, along with eventual same-week repeats of Survivor and The Amazing Race, and repeats of CBS event programming such as the Grammy Awards. CBS Television Distribution's syndicated newsmagazine Entertainment Tonight began to package and produce all of TVGN's red carpet coverage as a cable extension of that program, though the network's existing programming agreements with competing program/website PopSugar continue to be maintained.
Among Americans who subscribe to traditional pay-TV service (i.e., excluding cord-cutters and cord-nevers), basic cable came out on top as the top choice for TV viewing on Cowen & Co.’s survey. Still, Netflix was a very close second: For those who subscribe to a traditional TV package, basic cable was the top response (26%), followed by Netflix (24%) and broadcast TV (19%).
Did you know that people in or near big cities can receive the major network channels (ABC, CBS, NBC, FOX, CW), plus PBS and local stations in Hi-Def for free? It’s called broadcast digital TV. I was able to get thirty channels total in Providence, RI and over 100 in Los Angeles, CA. It takes a little leg work to set it up, but I’ll guide you through it.
Apple TV ($149 - $199): Similar to the Amazon Fire, the Apple TV is fantastic for dedicated Mac families, allowing them to sync programing between iPhones, iPads and laptops. Apple also has one of the better interfaces for finding and organizing content, with an app simply called “TV” that’s designed to function a lot like a DVR, keeping the latest episodes of your favorite shows in an easily accessible queue. Note: Netflix shows can be searched via the "TV" app, but they can't be added to its queue; users are simply redirected to the Netflix app.
PlayOn – If you've got an Xbox 360 or Playstation 3, this software download lets you wirelessly stream internet video content from Hulu, Netflix, and more right to your game box. It'll also pick up content from ESPN.com and CBS.com, or grab a free plugin to stream programming from The Weather Channel, Adult Swim, The Food Network, and more. PlayOn has a 14-day free trial, then you'll have to pop for $40 to keep it.

ClearStream's final entry is the 4MAX, which is an improvement on the 4V when it comes to range and general setup. Quality-wise, this offers what you'd expect from the previous ClearStream antennas with a 70- mile range and 4K capability. That said, the 4MAX is able to bump up the range a bit in the right conditions. And it does use a more streamlined design over the 4V, making the overall setup much easier and saving a bit of space.
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